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20121207
20121207
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
CNBC
Dec 7, 2012 6:00am EST
'm becky quick along with joe kernen and steve liesman. the november jobs report is now just about 150 minutes away. count do countdown is on. the economy probably added about 80,000 jobs last month. reuters consensus is a little higher at 93,000. the unemployment rate expected to hold steady at 7.9% and economists say the slow down in nonfarm payrolls will reflect the effect of sandy. joining us this hour is bank of america merrill lynch global research senior research economist michelle mire and we'll talk through everything that's been happening through jobs and what to expect. but first, there is a developing story. an earthquake off the northeast coast of japan triggered a tsunami warning. the warning has been lifted, but it was a 7.3 quake. so far no reports of any injuries or damage. it was for the same area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami back in march of last year. we will continue to bring you any developments. in the meantime, steve has some of the morning's top other stories. >> let's start with the markets. asian stocks rallying to 2012 highs overnight. the nikkei
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 12:00pm PST
, becky hays, with adam ried in the equipment corner and jack bishop in the tasting lab. discover the secrets of america's foremost food testers and tasters, today on america's test kitchen. today on america's test kitchen, julia shows chris how to make a moroccan-style chicken tagine at home, th
CNN
Dec 6, 2012 4:00pm PST
the world's greatest living explorer is about to cross antarctica on food. becky anderson spoke with him and i asked her about the conditions he faces. >> he is already considered the world's greatest living explorer. this 68-year-old british pioneer has today marked the start of the coldest journey on earth. that is crossing the ant ark arctic on food in winter. we are talking at 2,000 miles in almost complete darkness in temperatures that plunge to minus 90 degrees celsius. as he told me, if anyone on his team gets injured, they are on their own. >> if we run into problems like that, there is no help. all the rescue facilities shut off. that's why every government, the americans, the germans, have rules you do not let civilians go down there in winter because if something happens, they will become an embarrassment to their government. >> well, after four years, he managed to get permission and his ship is on its way. he told me there's just one thing he's looking forward to before he sets off and that is a long, hot, soapy bath. it will be his last for six months. >> wow, that is prett
CNN
Dec 7, 2012 9:00am PST
. becky anderson is live in london. wow, becky. this is unbelievable. i've never heard of anything like this. how is this guy supposed to survive? how does he do this? >> well, i think that's what they're going to learn, whether they can survive. for six months in the dark, suzanne. let's remember that it's winter between march and september in antarctica, so it will be dark for most of the time, and as you say, the temperatures will be below 90 degrees centigrade, or 130 degrees fahrenheit. that is something else. as with all these expeditions worth their salt, they'll be carrying out some scientific experiments. they'll also be raising some $15 million for seeing is believing, which is a global charity to prevent blindness. there's lots of good reasons why they're doing this, but if you are arguably the greatest living british explorer, there is more to it than that. there are two words that i think come to mind when you talk to explorers. that's ego, and this great sense of competition. have a listen to what he said about that. >> people that wanted these records as much as we do are
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)